some Lesson Samples

 

Title: Art and Advertising

Author: Rachel Ebeling

Subject: English

Grade Level: 10th

 

Unit Description

This unit focuses on the differences between art and advertising and uses the history of the folktale and fairytale as an example. Throughout the entire unit, students will be exposed to a variety of media and will have to decipher when a creative work is art and when it is advertising. In addition, students will learn about how the folktale evolved into the fairytale, or how a piece of art (the folktale) came to be utilized and exploited by the upper-class as propaganda (the fairytale) to serve a specific political, social, and economic agenda. As the difference between art and advertising is subtle (often the same creative work can be art or advertising depending on its intent), students will be given the opportunity to use technology to turn art into advertising or advertising into art as their final project.

 

Lesson Descriptions

Lesson 1: Before this lesson, students will have watched a five-minute podcast on art and a five-minute podcast on advertising. During class, they will discuss the pros and cons of the two and they will be exposed to a variety of software that they can use for their final project.

Lesson 2: Before class, students will have read a brief blog post on the history of the folktale and how it evolved into the fairytale. During class, they will discuss which folktale, fairytale, or other piece of art or advertising they would like to use for their final project. They will then begin working on their final project.

Lesson 3: Before class, students will have continued working on their final project. During class, they will finish their final project and share it with their friends, family, classmates, and the community at large by posting it online.

 

State Standards

Virginia English, Standard10.2.a-d: The student will analyze, produce, and examine similarities and differences between visual and verbal media messages through

a) Using media, visual literacy, and technology skills to create products

b) Evaluating sources including advertisements, editorials, blogs, Web sites, and other media for relationships between intent, factual content, and opinion

c) Determining the author’s purpose and intended effect on the audience for media messages

d) Identifying the tools and techniques used to achieve the intended focus

 

Objectives

Students will be able to understand the different purposes of art and advertising and be able to distinguish between the two.

Students will be able to discuss the various pros and cons of art and advertising and be able to defend their own conclusions.

Students will be able to create their own pieces of art or advertising by taking a piece of art and turning it into advertising or by taking a piece of advertising and turning it into art.

 

Lesson 1 (80 minutes) 

Objectives:

  • Students will be able to define art and advertising via an online and in-class discussion with 100% proficiency.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate how they will use a new piece of software for a final project with 100% proficiency.

Warm-up (20 minutes):

  • Have students respond to questions about the differences between art and advertising via Popplet based on what they learned from watching the podcasts on art and advertising. Then, facilitate a discussion about their responses that involves all students. Review different kinds of advertising (commercial, political, and social).

New Knowledge (10 minutes):

  • After briefly explaining what their final project will be (turning art into advertising or advertising into art), introduce a variety of image, audio, and video capturing and editing software. Demonstrate how two pieces of software (preferably one image and one audio) work and then allow students time to try some software out on their own via guided and independent practice.

Guided Practice (10 minutes):

  • Choose a piece of software that you haven’t demonstrated yet (preferably video), and have your students walk through it with you step-by-step. Answer any questions as necessary and then allow them time to try some new software out on their own.

Independent Practice (30 minutes):

  • As students are trying out different kinds of software, circle the classroom and provide help and feedback as necessary. Have students who are more tech-savvy help those who are less so. Encourage them to start brainstorming about what they want to do for their final project and then have them focus on specific software that will help them best complete their project.

Wrap-up (10 minutes):

  • Have students share a new understanding about art or advertising and how it is relevant to their personal life via an electronic exit slip using Google Forms. Also have them include their favorite piece of software and how they intend to use it. Finally, have them identify something they would like to review in the next lesson.

Formative Assessment:

  • Provide ongoing assessment throughout the lesson by observing and encouraging student participation in class discussions, asking and answering questions during guided and independent practice sessions, and volunteering and providing comments, ideas, and encouragement. At the end of the lesson, read student warm-ups and wrap-ups and use the following questions below to evaluate their learning:
    • Do students understand that the main difference between art and advertising is intent or purpose?
    • Do students demonstrate a basic knowledge of a specific piece of capturing or editing software?

Adaptations:

  • This lesson contains a wide variety of assessments and strategies to enhance individual learning experience. In addition, students with individual learning styles will be assisted through one-on-one teacher support, peer tutoring, use of visual and auditory methods, and interactive technology.

Materials:

  • Podcasts: Art, Advertising
  • Websites: Popplet, YouTube, PhotoStory, VoiceThread, Glogster, Animoto, Storybird, Camstudio, Screenr, Knavio, Greenshot, Pixlr, Google Forms

 

Lesson 2 (80 minutes) 

Objectives:

  • Students will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of the history of the folktale and the fairytale as teams via a class competition with 100% accuracy.
  • Students will be able to present their idea for a final project and demonstrate a new piece of technology to a small group with 100% proficiency.

Warm-up (15 minutes):

  • Have students depict the differences between the folktale and fairytale through drawing a poster or short comic strip. Then, facilitate a discussion about their visual representations that involves all students. Ensure that students respond to their classmates’ work and comments with respect.

New Knowledge (10 minutes):

  • After briefly reviewing what students learned from reading the blog post and participating in the class discussion, explain how folktale and fairytale motifs have continued to evolve up to the present day. Show examples from older and newer Disney movies, the Shrek series, and other commercials that involve fairytales to demonstrate the point that the lines between art and propaganda are easily blurred.

Guided Practice (15 minutes):

  • Divide students into teams of three and give each team ten slips of paper with an event from the history of the folktale and fairytale written on it. Have each team race to put each slip of paper in the correct order. Then, circle around to each table and compare the results. Provide feedback as necessary.

Independent Practice (30 minutes):

  • Assign half of the teams to the brainstorming station and half to the computer station. At the brainstorming station, students will present their idea for the final project to the rest of their teammates and receive feedback, while at the computer station students will demonstrate a new piece of software to their teammates and explain how they will use it for their final project. Each team will have 15 minutes at each station.

Wrap-up (10 minutes):

  • Have each team share a new understanding about the folktale or fairytale and a question they still have about a piece of software with the rest of the class. Use any remaining time to work on the final projects.

Formative Assessment:

  • Provide ongoing assessment throughout the lesson by observing and encouraging student participation in class discussions, asking and answering questions during guided and independent practice sessions, and volunteering and providing comments, ideas, and encouragement. At the end of the lesson, collect student warm-ups and take notes on wrap-ups. Then use the following questions below to evaluate their learning:
    • Do students understand that folktales and fairytales have been used throughout history to ennoble the individual and control the masses?
    • Do students have any major deficiencies in their understandings of basic editing software?

Adaptations:

  • This lesson contains a wide variety of assessments and strategies to enhance individual learning experience. In addition, students with individual learning styles will be assisted through one-on-one teacher support, peer tutoring, use of visual and auditory methods, and interactive technology.

Materials:

  • Blog post about the history of the folktale and fairytale.
  • Clips from Disney moves, the Shrek series, and commercials using fairytale motifs.

 

Description and Checklist for Final Project:

Take an existing piece of art and turn it into advertising, or take a piece of advertising and turn it into art (remember, advertising can be commercial, political, or social). You will be working on your final project individually, but will be sharing it with the rest of the class. Use the following checklist to guide your work. Each item is worth 4 points.

Purpose (What):

The purpose of your creative work is deliberate and focused. However, it can be subtle or overt, depending on your intent.

Audience (Who):

Your creative work is designed for a specific audience. Graphics, music, and subject matter are appropriate for your chosen audience.

Relevance (Why):

Your creative work is relevant to your own life and to the lives of others in the 21st century, particularly, your specific audience. Its relevance should be obvious, but an explanation can be provided if you so choose.

Creativity (How):

Your creative project is, or course, creative. It grabs your audience’s attention and plays with their expectations. Use of humor of pathos is an added bonus.

Quality (How):

Your images contribute to your purpose and the sounds are clear and consistently audible throughout your creative work.

 

Podcast for Lesson 1:

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